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The Final Frontier?
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Dr. E. Worm
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In 1968, brilliant artist/pretentious weirdo Andy Warhol made a very strange, now famous prediction. "In the future," he said, "everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes." Though he had no way of knowing it, that prediction has proven incredibly true. Today, thanks to the wonders of Web 2.0, all it takes for someone to nab their 15 minutes (or more realistically, their couple of weeks) is a webcam and an imagination. And nab them, they do. Sites like YouTube, Myspace, and hell, even niche corners of the Interwebs like Newgrounds and 4chan are filled with cultural phenomena and "celebrities" that appear quickly and disappear even quicker. Will this always be the case? Can the entertainers of the Internet aspire to more than just heavy YouTube traffic for a week or a couple chuckles at a funny picture of a cat? I certainly think so, and the evidence is everywhere. It's an exciting time to be a consumer of entertainment, and it's an even more exciting time to be us Fourth Perspectivites, the creators of entertainment.

Allow me to make a prediction of my own. In the future, anyone can be world-famous forever. With the advent of the Internet and the decreasing cost of complex equipment, the line between amateur and professional is becoming more and more blurred each day. Modern technology, especially the Internet, provides virtually anyone with the tools to create and distribute art to an audience of millions, potentially billions. The only thing that separates us from them is money, and on the Internet, the final frontier of entertainment, money is irrelevant. Our chances of success aren't that far off from those of the big studios, and as technology continues to become more affordable to the masses, the playing field will continue to even out. Just look at all of the Internet sensations of the past and present. We're succeeding where the big companies are failing. And while one person will probably never be able to make a $200 million Hollywood blockbuster in their garage, the Internet also makes it so that even us amateurs don't have to go it alone. People on opposite sides of the globe can connect with each other and collaborate on projects. It's happening all over the place, from the innumerable Newgrounds collabs to a musical being written right here on Fourth Perspective.

The future is bright. I can envision a day not too far from now when all people, fed up with the crap churned out daily onto their television screens, will turn to the Internet not just for a couple of quick punchlines, but for more genuine, sincere, passionate, funny, serious, brilliant art than the studio system could ever give them. Or even better, they'll create it themselves. But until then...



P.S.
Yeah, I write for the front page now. Dream big, kids.

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Wed Aug 06, 2008 6:27 pm View user's profile Send private message
Michael Danton
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Congratulations on your first news post, and what a post it is! Never before have I heard the current social phenomena of the internet expressed so eloquently and on those remarks I think you've got it absolutely right, it is a wonderful and exciting time to make your name and even your living on the internet.
The internet as it exists today, is for the most part a symbiotic relationship and will function similarly to FourthPerspective in regards to owing credit where it's due; however it's a very, very slow process and the playing field is hardly fair or equitable given the unlimited resources of some and the overwhelming influence of the elitist search engines. Some may argue that point, but I can do no more than direct them to the waves of spam mail we encounter here on a daily basis, proof that mainstream exposure can only be generated by underhanded and disruptive means.

The Concept of this website is to give everyone fair representation and succeed on their own merits, an honorable pursuit by any measure; but it doesn't just stop there, it's a forum for communication and as you've mentioned, communication and collaboration has never been easier than it is now. For the creative community, it seems amazing opportunities are just waiting to be discovered. Of course it's never that easy in practice, it takes more than hard work and motivation, but if you're dedicated and can find like minded individuals, you can take your art to the next level.

Andy was right on that point, everyone CAN get their 15 minutes, but seldom do they try to muscle a few more seconds of limelight from the next fellow... And there's always a next fellow, not everyone can win and there's never enough chairs when the music stops. I salute success and the successful, but only if it's deserved.

Doc, you deserve this, and your 15 Minutes of fame here at FourthPerspective will last as long as you distinguish yourself as you have done today.

Michael Danton.

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Wed Aug 06, 2008 10:02 pm View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
LazyPint
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That was a good post.

As with all news posts, I have to wonder: how many pictures were in it? Just the two?
Thu Aug 07, 2008 3:07 am View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
Michael Danton
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It was damn good. Two pictures is all I can see, are you having trouble seeing some of the pictures on the site?
M.

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Thu Aug 07, 2008 7:09 am View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
LazyPint
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I remember missing out on a couple of yours in the news posts. There was one of a Bible with a knife through it. Couldn't see that.
Thu Aug 07, 2008 9:33 am View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
Michael Danton
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Yes, I know exactly which one you mean- it only lasted for a little while. I assume the url I used was broken at the source shortly after I posted. The same can be said for a few other old posts too. It's going to be good when we've got a general resource upload section going here, then disappearing urls won't be a problem, not like their anything more than a nuisance now.

M.

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Thu Aug 07, 2008 11:24 am View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
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An interesting topic indeed.
I find that the differences between the widely embraced, forever famous actors and writers, and the common "15 minute fame" internet fad is that the people who become famous on the internet generally lack the ability to maintain that level of professionalism. It's like Mike said, "seldom do they try to muscle a few more seconds of limelight from the next fellow". I absolutely agree, and I think the reasoning behind this is obvious: These people don't make a living off their fame, they can't anticipate the hordes of band-wagon jumping, fad driven teens, so that when it's all over they just go back to their normal lives. The writers and actors follow up their blockbuster hits with another book, another film, another internationally acclaimed success. What does the internet have to follow up on?

If you really strive to create an everlasting fame started on the internet, I think that you can achieve that goal. If you go about it the right way, and you create something that is engaging to the masses, but not just a mere fad, if you can really play to your strengths, and if your strengths can actually compete with the real life competition, then there's no reason why you can't go out onto the internet and launch a career from it. If you're a musician, you can set up a band myspace, you can post videos on youtube, you can even compose and record everything in your own house if you so choose. The times are changing, in the past, the only way to become famous from music is to get a record deal. Now, a nobody plays a song he wrote named "Chocolate Rain" on a keyboard and posts the video on youtube, and suddenly he's a somebody.

I've seen a little bit of internet fame come from Newgrounds. Nowhere near the extent of most internet celebrities and fads, but to get to a level where a lot of people in the community know who you are. I'm somewhat of a regular in the Newgrounds audio portal, and it's interesting to see what people do to get their music heard, and to become popular. People 0-voting other submission on Tuesday night, right before the weekly updates in the hope that their song will reach the weekly top 5 submissions list. The list is a lie, it's succeptible to human manipulation. The only way to get on that list is either through luck, or through building a loyal fan-base. People like MaestroRage, cornandbeans, ParagonX9, they're envied because of their fan-base, top of the charts every time. And they continue to gain popularity so long as they continue to churn out decent music. But if they stop doing what they're doing, or if their standard drops, then people will come in and make claims like "hey, this guy's so overrated, why'd we everlike him?" and so some come and go, and few ever stick around and stick through everything and make a name for themselves.

I'd definitely like to see how things work out in the future...

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Thu Aug 07, 2008 9:39 pm View user's profile Send private message
Michael Danton
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Quite right, that's what I was talking about before in terms of elitism. The search engines and band-wagon jumpers are basically the same in terms of keeping popular sites/people exactly where they are with objectivity running a different race. In the case of Chocolate Rain, which I've never actually seen in completeness... I didn't have to, I was shown it by network television and TOLD it was good and worth watching... He's got a funny voice? Sounds to me like a great premise for a bandwagon, in fact ANY premise is perfect for a bandwagon because it puts you in a club and you're in 'the know'. It's a strange and recent phenomena but it clearly exists, almost as a product of the net.

Chocolate rain is yet another moaning Minnie who thinks he's better than he is.
The numa guy should try getting off his arse once in a while and dance off some pounds.
Chris Crocker has obvious mental instability including delusions of grandeur and dysmorphic sympathy with Brittney Spears.
The emperor isn't wearing any damn clothes!

These people aren't worth our collective time, they're just amusements like a freak-show. Of course once you've seen the mangled stump, flippers, bearded lady or leperous microcephalic contortionist midget. You have no desire to see them again UNLESS it's a niche... Chris Crocker tried to fill a niche by producing another film, not about Brittney or him screaming like he's having his gastrointestinal tract flossed with razor-wire. It was a parody of the Aussie party-guy with the big glasses which we've all forgotten about by now. Chris has jumped out of his niche as the screaming little bitch that makes us feel superior in our masculinity to just another wise-guy on the net like it wasn't already thoroughly choked with them. POW! Immediately after the net is choked with screaming bitches to take his place at Oprah's side. To me it's no different than Jackass or Dirty Sanchez or the Dudesons or a number of different shows where they hoot like idiots as someone gets powdered glass blown into their eyeballs... It's pathetic.

ALIVE!
M

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Thu Aug 07, 2008 11:16 pm View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
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Well, you don't really expect big things from them. I was actually quite "behind the times" in terms of coming across these "internet phenomena". What really disappoints me is that you get these wannabe teen fads in the real world. Your mentioning of Jackass got me thinking about that. I cringe every time I see a trailer for a "... Movie" movie, I hate it how people my own age are watching those college spoof movies that are nothing more than vulgar jokes written specifically for my generation. When these sort of films started, I could handle it, I could laugh at them because the jokes were no where near as god-awful as they are now. I'm getting the impression that the internet is having a large impact on the mainstream media. It's disappointing to know that all movies targeted specifically at teens are shit, it's insulting. I would actually like to believe that I'm not being typecast as a mindless moron who gets a thrill out of anything with a shock value. I haven't seen anything from the American Pie series, I haven't seen any parody movies since Scary Movie 3, I haven't seen Saw or any of those shock value horror films.

Now, this reaction would probably get people thinking "woah, this guy's a serious prick", but I'm not. I enjoy a laugh just as much as the next person, but I like to laugh at something because of an intellectually crafted pun, or a clever witty remark, I don't want to have to laugh at how pathetic some "comedy" is. I've said it before, and I'll say it again, these parody movies defy the common beliefs that comedies are funny. Thank god there's still films like Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz and Team America, that keep reminding me that there are outrageous comedies out there that are funny.

I think it's fitting to bring up one movie in particular; Idiocracy. I love this film. It makes all those terrible jokes, but the context is just brilliant. Let's laugh at how stupid we'll become if we keep on worshipping false idols. People will just find something new and meaningless to praise, following fads like mindless zombies, it's a shame that this parody movie franchise/fad is still going. Is there still a market for it?

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Fri Aug 08, 2008 1:01 am View user's profile Send private message
subpar
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Let's not be too optimistic.

While the internet does allow everyday people to reach large audiences, I think we've all found that becoming world famous on the internet is still no easy task. Take us amateur writers, for example. Whereas one young adult's chances of actually being noticed by a big publishing company are very slim, regardless of talent or lack thereof, the internet allows us to publish on our own terms, so to speak. Websites like Fourth Perspective help our writing to reach potentially enormous audiences (depending on web traffic), even if publishers wouldn't touch our writing with a ten foot pole. There are even self-publishing websites, such as Lulu and CreateSpace, that allow everyday people to publish their own print-on-demand books with a few clicks of a mouse.

So, you might think such self-publishing, combined with a world-wide network of computers accessible by millions, would make mainstream publishing irrelevant. Why spend so much money printing books? Things like YouTube should make mainstream television irrelevant, too, now that big companies aren't the only ones who can afford to broadcast to the entire planet. However, this probably isn't happening anytime soon. Occasionally, a site like YouTube finds raw talent in an independent author who otherwise would never be realized, but everyone and their grandma thinks they're that one lucky person. There's too much junk on the internet, because it's too easy for computer owners to put their entire lives on display for the whole world to see. Basically, we've given everyone on Earth a megaphone. You only get your fifteen minutes of fame if you momentarily scream louder than the other guy. Okay, so that analogy isn't exactly accurate. But finding fame on the internet is only slightly easier than finding fame in real life... perhaps even harder, because now everyone is doing it.

In order to truly become world-famous, you still have to do something outstanding and original. While the internet takes away a lot of the obstacles, like money and time, but doesn't help to weed out the garbage. In fact, it does the opposite.
Fri Aug 08, 2008 9:52 pm View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dr. E. Worm
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All true, but what I'm saying is that gradually, as we learn more about how this new medium works, these weird little fads and phenomenons will start to be phased out. All of the past and present phenomena seem to be random, accidental even, but with time, true talent is going to understand how to rise to the top. Not that "the top" will necessarily even matter. I don't think that the Internet is going to work in quite the same way as traditional media. Freed from the shackles of both financial issues (which necessitate streamlining for as large an audience as possible) and censorship, Internet artists can make (virtually) whatever they want, for whoever they want. Everything will be for a niche audience, so I'm not sure if that all-encompassing "world fame" will even be relevant anymore.

As for the garbage, that's the beauty of the Internet. You don't have to see it, you don't even have to sift through it if you know what you're looking for. And even the garbage isn't completely without value. It's valuable to the person who made it. To them, it's a piece of pop culture made entirely by and for themselves. They win because they get to create, and we win because we don't have to look at their shitty creations if we don't want to.

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Fri Aug 08, 2008 10:21 pm View user's profile Send private message
Michael Danton
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The trouble is... Often times we don't know what we want, or what we're looking for, or even when to laugh as in the case of canned laughter, prevalent in the types of shows that have WB's ire and mine too. As he said, it's all about the shock value in all it's varied forms, whether it be sexual, violence, or generally queer themes. The "*" movie series has it all in abundance and because of it, little redeeming quality.

Just tonight I was looking around for a movie to watch, I had my choice of paper-thin action films but chose instead "Shepherd of the mountain". A drama directed by John Ford and starred John Wayne, supported by Harry Carey, the first film either had ever done in Technicolor. Despite the fact there were no shootouts, overt sexual innuendo, explosions, "cock jokes" and the violence was only explicit enough to move the story along, it was thoroughly entertaining! More-so than "300", the "Pirates" sequels- in fact any new films you could name which begs the question... Why don't they make films like that these days?... My answer, I don't know.

It wasn't an expensive film and there were no special effects to be seen; however in reflection it would seem that even Hollywood falls prey to the bandwagon, otherwise known as "star power". The fact is, people NEED to be told what and who to like, starting with a cast list. If they made the same film with no-name actors every bit as good as Kim Kardashian, Paris Hilton, Pamela Anderson or any other star of a "leaked" sex video, then it might be run a few times on daytime TV and not a lot more.

I digress, I believe the reason you can't make a cheap and economically viable film these days is because you need to hire an expensive whore.

Furthermore, who were these people before their little indiscretions? One was a playboy bunny, there was a spoiled rich girl and the third... Well, where did copycat Kim Kardashian come from anyway? Never mind... The point I'm making is that not even Paris Hilton could buy celebrity, she had to get down on her hands and knees and prove she was queen of the sluts.

The same applies here... No, not that Laughing Once we've got a fair and equitable system going and a handful of writers prove themselves to be the best of many, they will be known as the best, they will be read constantly and no amount of money can buy that acclaim. Mark my words, agents will be clamoring all over trying to get your book published.

Like Subpar said, the bigger the site, the more dramatic the effect; but even a site like this one needs a sex video, luckily it's already in the bag!
M.

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Last edited by Michael Danton on Sat Aug 09, 2008 9:02 am; edited 1 time in total
Sat Aug 09, 2008 8:06 am View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dr. E. Worm
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The whole point of my original post was that we, the "unknown" people, can make movies like that ourselves, that other people will enjoy more than what Hollywood churns out. Though Hollywood (or rather, the independent studios) can still make great movies. "There Will Be Blood" is the most recent thing that springs to mind, though it looks kind of expensive. And also, despite all the obnoxious marketing blitzes and heaping spoonfuls of expensive, sugary special-effects laden crap, I still have faith in Hollywood to occasionally give us one of those truly great popcorn movies ("Iron Man" had me pleasantly surprised), even if George Lucas has forgotten how to.

P.S.
Seriously, George. You're at three-and-a-half strikes (I slightly enjoyed "Revenge of the Sith." Sue me), now about to probably make it four. Quit now and spare a tiny bit of your dignity.

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Sat Aug 09, 2008 9:01 am View user's profile Send private message
Michael Danton
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You can make a movie sure, a genuine youtube masterpiece! Trouble is... How do I find it on youtube or anything else worth watching for that matter? The star rating system is rubbish like NG where people only vote in 0's or 5's and failing that, you're left with whatever you're told to watch "Numa Numa" for instance.

Whatever the case, even Gary Busey's verbal wankings will get immensely more views by default than anything we'd have to offer. The same can be said about Paris Hilton (yawn) she can have a book ghostwritten for her with her picture on the front and it'll blow everything else off the shelves.

Maybe literally. Rolling Eyes
M.

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Sat Aug 09, 2008 9:15 am View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
subpar
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Dr. E. Worm wrote:
[...] Everything will be for a niche audience, so I'm not sure if that all-encompassing "world fame" will even be relevant anymore.

As for the garbage, that's the beauty of the Internet. You don't have to see it, you don't even have to sift through it if you know what you're looking for. And even the garbage isn't completely without value. It's valuable to the person who made it. To them, it's a piece of pop culture made entirely by and for themselves. They win because they get to create, and we win because we don't have to look at their shitty creations if we don't want to.

Good point.

But I wouldn't necessarily say that the shitty artists always win. Some of them have oodles of false hope and think that the Sonic the Hedgehog fan-fiction they posted on deviantART will get them a publishing deal with Random House or Penguin.

Michael Danton wrote:
Once we've got a fair and equitable system going and a handful of writers prove themselves to be the best of many, they will be known as the best, they will be read constantly and no amount of money can buy that acclaim. Mark my words, agents will be clamoring all over trying to get your book published.

Well, that's what I'm hoping for, too. I just have to make sure I finish a decent book before that happens.
Sat Aug 09, 2008 2:47 pm View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
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